- - ABC-INDEX - -

12/31/2017

Welcome !

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Welcome to O-Mamori ! お守り and Mingei 民芸 ! 

The rich world of Japanese amulets and talismans,
sold at Buddhist temples and Shinto shrine all over Japan.




The folk art and folk craft of Japan with its many folk toys (gangu 玩具)
has produced many small items to protect from illness, bring good luck and money and wish for general happiness for the family.
Introducing regional monsterlins, ghosts and demons and how people coped with them.
Introducing miniatures of figures from festivals and rituals and much more !


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. . - - - - ABC - INDEX - - - - . .

- AAA - / - BBB - / - CCC - / - DDD - / - EEE -

- FFF - / - GGG - / - HHH - / - I I I - / - JJJ -

- KK KK - / - LLL - / - MMM - / - NNN - / - OOO -

- PPP - / - QQQ - / - RRR - / - SSS - / - TTT -

- UUU - / - VVV - / - WWW - / - XYZ -


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. General Information . Essays .



. Join the Ukiyo-E friends on facebook ! .




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Amulets from Shrines and Temples
. Shinsatsu 神札 , Mamorifuda 守り札 .


How to make a wish come true . . .
. Gankake 願掛け wish-prayer, to make a wish .


Little things for good luck
. Engimono 縁起物


Folk Art and Folk Craft
. mingei 民芸 and folk craft museums

. minzokugaku 民俗学 / 民族学 folklore studies, ethnology .


Kyoodoo gangu 郷土玩具 Kyodo Gangu Folk Toys
. Regional Folk Toys from Japan .
- From Hokkaido to Okinawa -


Regional monsters and demons
. Yookai 妖怪 Yokai monsters, demons - Introduction
yuurei 幽霊 Yurei, ghost
bakemono 化け物  o-bake お化け


Furusato, home village, home town, Heimat
This is where you feel at home, where the ancestors are close by, where everything is all right. It is an emotion deep inside the Japanese soul.
. Furusato ふるさと, 故郷、古里 .


. Festivals, Ceremonies, Rituals . SAIJIKI

. Kami to Hotoke - the Deities of Japan .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples .


. WASHOKU - Regional Dishes from Japan


. Reference, Books . . . .


Your guide is

Dr. Gabi Greve
Okayama Japan

. Daruma Museum Japan .


- - - The alphabetical Daruma index: - - -
Use your browser to find a keyword.

. Contents A - C . - - - . Contents D - F .
. Contents G - J . - - - . Contents K .
. Contents L - N . - - - .Contents O - R .
. Contents S . - - -  . Contents T - Z .








. Join the MINGEI group on facebook ! .

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This BLOG is dedicated to
the brave people of Tohoku, after March 11, 2011

. Japan after the BIG earthquake March 11, 2011

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- - - - - - #omamori #mingei #folklore #folkart #legendsofjapan -
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12/30/2017

- Omamori - INFO

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quote
Omamori (御守, o-mamori)
are Japanese amulets dedicated to particular Shinto deities as well as Buddhist figures. The word mamori (守り) means protection, with omamori being the polite sonkeigo form of the word mamoru, "to protect".

Design and function

The amulet covering is usually made of cloth and encloses papers or pieces of wood or paper with prayers written on them which are supposed to bring good luck to the bearer on particular occasions, tasks or ordeals. Omamori are also used to ward off bad luck and are often spotted on bags, hung on cellphone straps, in cars, etc. for safety in travel. Many omamori are specific in design to the location they were made.

They often describe on one side the specific area of luck or protection they are intended for and have the name of the shrine or temple they were bought at on the other. Generic omamori exist, but most of them cover a single area: health, love, or studies, to name only a few. It is said that omamori should never be opened or they lose their protective capacities. Amulets are replaced once a year to ward off bad luck from the previous year. Old amulets are usually returned to the shrine or temple so they can be disposed of properly.

Modern commercial uses
There are modern commercial versions for these that are typically not spiritual in nature and are not issued by a shrine or temple. They do not confer protection or need to be replaced every year. It has become popular for stores in Japan to feature generic omamori with popular characters such as Mickey Mouse, Hello Kitty, Snoopy, Kewpie, etc.



Some popular omamori are:

Kanai Anzen: For good health and help with illness.
Kōtsū Anzen: Protection for drivers and travelers of all sorts.
En-musubi: Available for singles and couples to ensure love and marriage.
Anzan: Protection for pregnant women during term and to ensure a safe and easy delivery.
Gakugyō Jōju: for students and scholars.
Shōbai Hanjō: Success in business and matters of money.

source : WIKIPEDIA


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People go to a temple or shrine and pray or make a vow for something special.
They hope their prayers will be heared and richess, health etc. bestowed upon them.

goriyaku, go riyaku 御利益, ご利益 reward
receiving merits and benefits


Vows and prayers must be sincerely petitioned and gratitude must be shown if a wish is granted.
Otherwise there will be a divine retribution (tatari 祟り 。たたり)


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special fuda talismans, shinpu 神符
taima たいま(大麻), oonusa おおぬさ
gofu, gofuu 護符/御符




gohei 御幣(ごへい)strips of white paper on a wand
used to purify a place or person by waving over it.


nusa 幣(ぬさ)
They come in many variations, according to the shrine and deity they are used for.

quote
Gohei
A kind of ritual wand; one type of heihaku, also called heisoku. Originally gohei were identical to cloth offerings called mitegura, but the term gradually came to be used in today's more narrow sense. Gohei are made by attaching zig-zag strips of gold, silver, white or multicolored (five-color) paper to a staff (called a heigushi) made of bamboo or other wood.

Originally, offerings of cloth were presented to the kami by attaching them to a staff, and this practice forms the origin for today's customary gohei. Also, while rectangular paper was used at first, the custom later developed of attaching streamers called shide to the sides.

Originally an offering to the kami, gohei stood deep within the sanctuary and came to be viewed as a mishōtai, an object in which the spirit of the kami resided, or else were placed before the kami as a decoration similar to mirrors, or were used as implements with which to purify worshipers at the shrine.
source : Motosawa Masashi, Kokugakuin, 2005



For some festivals there is a special
. gohei no atama kazari 御幣の頭飾り headgear with gohei decoration .




In Red and White, koohaku 紅白 for extra power.


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. Shimenawa 注連縄 a sacred rope .



MORE about

. Shinsatsu 神札 , Mamorifuda 守り札 .

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Have your own O-Mamori made
Produced by 池上實相寺 ikegami jissouji
- reference : omamo.me/ -

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12/29/2017

. . . Regional Toys . . . LIST

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. Regional Daruma Dolls from Japan .


  


Regional Folk Toys - From Hokkaido to Okinawa

日本の郷土玩具 gangu
日本のおもちゃ omocha


Use "MY LABLES" on the right side to find the entries.


CLICK for more photos



This BLOG is dedicated to the brave people of Tohoku.

. Japan after the BIG earthquake March 11, 2011

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HOKKAIDO 北海道 [ 道北 道東 道央 道南 ]

. HOKKAIDO . and . AINU .

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TOHOKU 東北 [ 青森 岩手 宮城 秋田 山形 福島 ]

. AKITA .

. AOMORI .

. FUKUSHIMA .

. IWATE .

. MIYAGI .

. YAMAGATA .


DARUMA after the great earthquake of March 11, 2011

. Tohoku Daruma .


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KANTO 関東
[ 東京 神奈川 埼玉 千葉 茨城 栃木 群馬 ]

. CHIBA .

. GUNMA, GUMMA .

. IBARAKI / IBARAGI .

. KANAGAWA - Yokohama - Kamakura .

. SAITAMA .

. TOCHIGI - Nikko .

. TOKYO - Edo .


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. . . . . Chubu, Chuubu Chihoo 中部地方





SHINETSU 信越 [ 新潟 長野 ]

. NAGANO .

. NIIGATA .

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HOKURIKU 北陸 [ 富山 石川 福井 山梨 ]

. FUKUI .

. ISHIKAWA .

. TOYAMA .

. YAMANASHI .


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TOKAI 東海 [ 愛知 岐阜 静岡 ]

. AICHI - Nagoya .

. GIFU . Hida, Mino .

. SHIZUOKA .


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KINKI / KANSAI 近畿 [ 大阪 兵庫 京都 滋賀 奈良 和歌山 三重 ]

. HYOGO - Kobe, Himeji .

. KYOTO, Kyooto, Kioto .

. MIE - Ise Shrine .

. NARA .

. OSAKA .

. SHIGA .

. WAKAYAMA Kishu .


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CHUGOKU CHIHO 中国 [鳥取 島根 岡山 広島 山口 ]
Western Japan 西日本 Nishi Nihon


. HIROSHIMA .

. OKAYAMA .

. SHIMANE .

. TOTTORI .

. YAMAGUCHI .


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SHIKOKU 四国 [ 徳島 香川 愛媛 高知 ]

. EHIME .

. KAGAWA .

. KOCHI (Koochi, Tosa) .

. TOKUSHIMA - AWA .


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KYUSHU Kyuushuu 九州
[ 福岡 佐賀 長崎 熊本 大分 宮崎 鹿児島 ]

. FUKUOKA - Hakata - Kita-Kyushu .

. KAGOSHIMA (Satsuma) .

. KUMAMOTO .

. MIYAZAKI, MIYASAKI .

. NAGASAKI .

. OITA .

. SAGA .


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.OKINAWA 沖縄 . Ryukyu 琉球 .


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. WASHOKU .
Regional Dishes from Japan



. O MATSURI お祭り .
Regional Festivals from Japan



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6/20/2017

Tengu kanban Kamban

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. Kanban 看板 Kamban Shop Signs - Introduction .
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kanban to tengu 天狗と看板 shop signs with Tengu goblins

. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-List .
- Introduction -


quote - Japan Times
Japan’s kanban’ are still hanging in there
Little information remains about the personal life of the artisan Kojiro Shimizu.
His personality and interests, his passions and motivations — all are shrouded in mystery. What we know is that he worked in Kyoto in the late 19th and early 20th century and that he appeared to be on good terms with members of the business community. He also happened to be a master carver of kanban, the traditional shop signs of Japan, and on rare occasions, when he produced a particularly elaborate piece, he marked it with his seal, perhaps succumbing to a brief moment of pride. Had he not done so, he would likely be completely unknown to us.
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Kanban could be sumptuous objects indeed. The most remarkable were carved in keyaki (Japanese zelkova) wood, valued for its rich grain and durability, and covered in lacquer. Many were enlivened with flowing calligraphy and decorated with gold leaves. Mother-of-pearl was also sometimes used to make details sparkle.
- snip -



In Edo Period Japan (1603-1868), patronage for artists and craftspeople grew to unprecedented levels, but strict sumptuary laws limited conspicuous display of opulence. Though these rules were unevenly enforced, they nevertheless imposed limits on the extravagance and glitter that merchants could use to advertise their wares. Partly as a result, savvy entrepreneurs came to rely on codes, puns and double-entendres adroitly presented on kanban in order to appeal to the sophisticated consumer classes of Japan’s largest cities.

For instance, shops purveying cards, a game disliked by the bakufu (shogunal government) because it was a gamblers’ favorite, often displayed a long-nosed tengu (goblin) on their kanban. This is because in Japanese, the name for cards, hanafuda, literally “flower cards,” can also be read as “nose cards.”
Other cases, equally playful, simply tried to elicit a smile from customers: stores selling sweets often advertised their goods using a wild horse, or ara-uma, which was a play on the term “Ara, umai!,” literally meaning, “Whoa, how sweet!”
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source : japantimes.co.jp/life/2017

hanakaruta 花かるた  鼻かるた 








. Tengu hanafuda 天狗花札 Tengu Playing Cards .



京都大石天狗堂 - 任天堂 Nintendo 1889

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てんぐわた




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. . . CLICK here for more Photos !


. Kanban 看板 Kamban Shop Signs - Introduction .

. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-List .


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. Join the MINGEI group on facebook ! .  



. Regional Folk Toys from Japan .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples .


. Tohoku after the BIG earthquake March 11, 2011

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- - - #kanban #kamban #tengukamban #tengukanban - - - - -
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6/19/2017

Tottori kasuri ikat

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. Kasuri 絣 Ikat - Introduction .
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San-In-gasuri 山陰絣 San-In Kasuri - Ikat from Tottori 鳥取県



is a speciality of the San-In Area, located in the north-western part of the main Island of Honshuu.
The main production areas are in 広瀬 Hirose, 倉吉 Kurayoshi and 弓浜 Yumihama.

................................................................................ Hirose 広瀬  

Hirose-gasuri, Hirose Kasuri 広瀬絣



- quote -
島根県安来市広瀬町 Hirosemachi Nogigun, Yasugi City, Shimane Prefecture.
Characteristics:
Hand woven cotton fabric with "Kasuri" designs which look more like folk craft. One of the Three Figure Kasuri in the Sanin District. Designs are delicately woven. It was once praised as good for its large designs in comparison to the middle sized designs in "Bingo (Hiroshima Prefecture) Gasuri" and small designs in "Kurume Gasuri." Most of the designs are "Sho-Chiku-Bai"(Pine, Bamboo, Plum) and "Tsuru-Kame"(Crane,Turtle), both of which are regarded as being auspicious in Japan. The futon mat in which "Hirose Gasuri" is used was a bridal mat as well as a death mat. It was a custom for the bride to take a futon mat made with Hirose Gasuri to her bridegroom as one of the bridal items. After it was used on the wedding night the mat was carefully kept and was used again as a death bed for the same woman.
A special technique called "Makase" is used in this Kasuri weaving. The part to be left undyed is not marked with Chinese ink (as is usual in most Kasuri weaving) but it is copied onto the pattern paper.
Uses: Clothing, bedding, cushions
History:
Hirose Gasuri was originated in Hirose where a doctorユs wife started weaving it after she studied the technique of dyeing and weaving "Yumigahama Gasuri" in Yonago in the Bunsei Era(1818-30). After that, the production flourished as the feudal government protected it. In and after the Koka Era(1844-48), an official designer of the government created a large design, which became widely known as characteristic of Hirose Gasuri. Its production equaled that of "Kurume Gasuri" in the Meiji Period. In the Meiji Era starting in 1897, some changes in the loom(from low to raised looms) and the threads(from hand to machine spun) were made for mass production. However, a big fire in 1915 and the WWII damaged its production. It is being revived today by a man named Amano, who is good in the technique of Kasuri weaving.
- source : kimono.or.jp/dictionary/eng -




. Tsuru Kame 鶴亀 Crane and Turtle patterns - Introduction .



................................................................................ Kurayoshi 倉吉  

Kurayoshi-gasuri, Kurayoshi Kasuri 倉吉絣



- quote -
Characteristics:
Cotton fabric, in which thick indigo dyed threads are used for both warp and weft. Designs are mostly traditional patterns. The fabric is thick.
Uses: Clothing, bedding, cushions.
History:
The newest among the 3 types of Kasuri of Sanin (Tottori, Shimane and northern Yamaguchi Prefectures). The Kurayoshi Kasuri was first woven under the influence of "Kurume Kasuri" and "Yumigahama Gasuri" and widely traded throughout Japan in the early Meiji Period. The designs at first were woven only with the weft. Since the middle of Meiji Period complicated designs were woven in "double ikat" (dyed threads are used both for warp and weft). Farmers side jobs at first, it was mechanized and produced in large amounts in the end of the Meiji to the Taisho Periods. After the Taisho, production declined. There are signs, however, that the Kurayoshi Gasuri will be revived today.
- reference source : -




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........................................................................... Yumihama, Yumigahama 弓浜  

Yumihama-gasuri, Yumihama Kasuri 弓浜絣



- quote -
Yumihama-gasuri Textile 弓浜絣
Japan’s famous medieval warlord Hideyoshi Toyotomi was the man who ended the nationwide feudal wars and became the head of the entire nation in 1590. After his death, the Tokugawa Shogun family took over his reign and the Edo period began, lasting from 1603 to 1868. During this time, Japan enjoyed great societal stability. Furthermore, the provincial samurai lords had promoted industries and trades within their territories. It was a great time in history when many arts and crafts were born and flourished. These objects were actively traded among provinces. Both Tottori and Shimane prefectures are famous for Kasuri fabric and Yumihama-Gasuri, which is characterized by a nice contrast between white patterns and dyed indigo blue. Both of these fabrics became increasingly popular at this time.

Kasuri fabrics are made of natural cotton. Making the fabrics was an important daily job for women in the villages. They made beddings as well as clothes for all occasions. Fans, turtles, cranes, fish, chrysanthemums, treasures, etc. were favorite patterns used for Kasuri, which is loosely woven and has a natural feel. One can easily sense the love and wisdom of a woman who chooses a certain pattern to wish her loved ones good luck for a special life event. For example, a mother might choose an anchor for her young bride to safely settle down in her new sea (environment), or an eagle for her newborn child or grandchild to “fly bravely” into the future like a bird.

In the 18th century, Yumihama-Gasuri became a major industry in Tottori, thanks to the hardworking women in the farming villages. They attended cotton fields during the day, and made and wove threads at night. In fact, Yumihama-Gasuri was an important source of income for the families. There were about 54 weaving houses in 1836.

Later on, rapid industrialization made the time consuming Yumihama-Gasuri method almost obsolete, with a lack of skillful successors to keep the craft alive. However, thanks to the recent popularity of handmade objects, people began rediscovering the beauty of the mystic dancing of white and indigo colors, set on weavers that emanate love and warmth. Although production is still limited to this day, local organizations have been working to train the next generation of Yumihama-gasuri artists. They also make accessories such as bags, hats, coin purses, porches, table cloths and so on, which are more affordable, but still send you love and good wishes.

- - - - - 2-124 Higashimachi Tottori-shi Tottori-ken
- source : japan-brand.jnto.go.jp/crafts -




. The White Rabbit of Inaba 因幡の白兎 .
and Okuninushi no Mikoto (Daikoku)

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. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

Legends about Kasuri Ikat
Even animals like to wear it . . .

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秋田県 Akita 雄勝郡 Ogachi district

kongasuri コンガスリ / 紺絣 blue Ikat
Around 1899. Children wearind blue Ikat robes were abducted from the village. The roads were then closed over night.

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群馬県 Gunma 利根郡 Tone district みなかみ町 Minakami

kappa カッパ Water Goblin
Once a member of the 林家 Hayashi family came back after washing his horse in the river to cool it. He heard a strange sound in 馬の舟 the food box of the horse. A Kappa was there waiting for the horse to come back. The man let the Kappa run away without punishment. From that day on, every night the Kappa brought a barrel full of fish to the house.
Then one day when a Kimono with an Ikat pattern was hanging on the line to dry, the Kappa saw it and never came back.
Ikat is one of the things a Kappa dislikes. So if people want to bath in the river, they better wear a light Ikat-pattern Kimono.

. things a Kappa dislikes and fears 嫌物 .

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岩手県 Iwate 九戸郡 Kunohe district 軽米町 Karumi

zashiki warashi 座敷わらし child spook
They live in the 曲がり家 Magaria farm houses and wear robes with blue Ikat patterns. Some are boys, some are girls.
They bring good luck to the family that lives there, but they are never really seen. If people try to take a peek, the child disappears.
They are also called ザシキボッコ Zankibokko.



. zashiki warashi 座敷童子 / ざしきわらし girl spooks .
in Iwate, Tono, Tohoku / 岩手県遠野 に伝えられる精霊的な存在

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奈良県 Nara 橿原市 Kashihara

kitsune 狐 Fox
Once an old person went to the Shrine, when he saw a nice girl standing there. Her hair was made up and she wore an Ikat Kimono. She even had her teeth blackened and laughed with a strange giggle. It was in fact not a human, but a Fox.

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吉野郡 Yoshino district 十津川村 Totsukawamura

nozuchi 野槌 / tsuchinoko ツチノコ Hammerspawn
They creep up at people and kill them. Once an old man saw a very large Tsuchinoko which wore a robe wit an Ikat pattern.

. nozuchi 野槌 / tsuchinoko ツチノコ Hammerspawn .

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岡山県 Okayama 笠岡市 Kasaoka

koboozu 小坊主 a young priest
At midnight a young priest in a Kimono with Ikat pattern appeared. Even if it was night and he was far away, people could clearly see the Ikat pattern of his robe.
But coming too close, nobody was there after all.


source : blog.goo.ne.jp/mitoyawool

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滋賀県 Shiga 愛知郡 Aichi district 愛東町 Aito

tanuki たぬき Tanuki badger
Tanuki like to shape-shift in a woman wearing a Kimono with an Ikat pattern. If people turn around to have a second look at them, there is nobody to be seen.



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島根県 Tottori

At the local school a ghost was seen regularly. Below the school was a grave and in the evening a man wearing a Kimono with an Ikat pattern was seen walking around. He went up to the school and to the toilet at the back, straight into the room for the "big delivery". When people peeked inside, there was nobody to be seen, only a strange red flame.
Sometimes they even heard a sound from the toilet room.

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- reference : Nichibun Yokai Database -




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6/06/2017

wagasa Japanese umbrella

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wagasa 和傘 Japanese paper umbrella

The umbrella is used quite often, especially during the rainy season.
But in haiku, it is used as a nonseasonal topic.

The most famous one is probably the
"Umbrella with the eye of a snake ja no me gasa  蛇の目傘",
which also is often used in Kabuki plays.



Look at some great collections of these umbrellas:
http://www.gendaiya.co.jp/s_wagasa.htm


. janomegasa 蛇の目の傘 Edo-umbrella .
and the manners of Edo (Edo shigusa 江戸しぐさ)


. tooyugami 桐油紙 Toyugami, oil paper with paulownia oil .
and the oil-paper raincoat Kappa 合羽


. kasa, karakasa 傘 / 唐傘  umbrella .
higasa 日傘 parasol
bangasa 番傘 Bangasa, "numbered umbrella"
kasa-sashi tanuki 傘さし狸 Tanuki with Umbrella
kasashi, kasa-shi 傘師 making umbrellas
kasa hari 傘張り gluing paper to umbrellas
furugasa kai 古傘買い buying old umbrellas in Edo


. karakasa obake から傘お化け / 唐傘お化け umbrella ghost .
The spirit of wagasa is called Karakasa Obake, umbrella ghost, a monster looking like a folded Wagasa, with a single eye and a single foot wearing a geta.

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CLICK for more photos !
葛飾北斎 Katsushika Hokusai
Some of the umbrellas have the large numbers of a Bangasa.

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- quote -
The umbrella was invented in ancient China as a canopy to be held over a nobleman. In 552, during the Asuka period, the umbrella was introduced to Japan through Kudara (the Korean peninsula) as part of Buddhist ceremonies.



The umbrella in Japan was originally called 'kinugasa', but because it came from China ('kara'), it was also called 'karakasa'. The original form of the umbrella was improved over time: the center tube and ribs were made from bamboo, and the covering was made from oilpaper, waterproofed with persimmon, linseed oil and China wood oil. Despite its strong water resistance, its major flaws were that it was neither light nor durable.

There are two types of Japanese umbrella:
the bangasa (coarse oilpaper umbrella) and janomegasa (snake-eye umbrella/paper umbrella). The janomegasa is made from paper, is blue in the center and at the edges, and white in between, and looks like the eye of a snake when viewed from above. This umbrella does have variations, such as painted black rings on the surface and the application of other astringent materials.

Currently, the kano umbrella, made in Kano, Gifu Prefecture, is proud to be to the only place in Japan to be a major producer of traditional Japanese umbrellas.
- source : nippon-kichi.jp/article -

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- quote -
Differences between Japanese and Western umbrellas
Many people think that Japanese umbrellas and Western umbrellas are not so different. Nothing could be further from the truth. Both come from completely different traditions in terms of use, design, materials, structure, and craft expertise.
First of all,
the materials are very different. Western umbrellas are made with artificial materials like plastic, polyester, steel, etc. On the other hand, Japanese umbrellas are made with natural materials like washi paper, bamboo, etc.
A Japanese umbrella has 30-70 ribs while most Western ones only have eight. Western umbrellas open when the tension in the metal ribs press up on the covering of the umbrella. Japanese umbrellas open as the many thin bamboo ribs spread the washi paper and stretch it tight. When open, Western umbrellas are dome shaped while Japanese umbrellas have straight line.
They also fold away differently.
Western umbrellas are wrapped around the central column and handle. Japanese umbrellas collapse together and most of the surface structure is folds inward and out of sight.
The ribs of Japanese umbrellas
are made by splitting bamboo into very thin strips. The precision of the final rib structure and the washi paper glued to it work together to fold away simply and elegantly.
When a Western umbrella is put in a stand
or leaned against something the handle is always up. Japanese umbrellas stand with the handle touching the ground.



◆ How to make a traditional Japanese umbrella
01 Material preparation
02 Frame construction
03 The paper covering is cut to size
04 The glue is mixed
05 The paper coveringis carefully attached
06 The glue is allowed to dry
07 Lacquering and painting
08 Application of linseed oil
09 Finishing and final decoration

- - - - - Look at the photos here
- source : wagasa.com/en/kyowagasa -


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In Japan, farmers and travellers in olden times used a large straw hat as umbrella, sometimes translated as umbrella-hat (kasa, 笠).
. - umbrella hat (kasa 笠) - .

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- ABC - List of Wagasa from the Prefectures


................................................................................ Gifu 岐阜県  

Gifu wagasa 岐阜和傘



- quote -
Traditional Craft Skills that Fashion Umbrellas from Bamboo and Paper
Still known today as a center for the production of traditional Japanese umbrellas, manufacture of wagasa began in the Kano district of Gifu City in the middle of the 18th century. At that time the state had feudal organization and the local lords had a great deal of economic and political autonomy within the domains to which they were assigned. The feudal lord who was transferred in to rule the feudal domain around Gifu had to contend with a local economy that was devastated by floods. He saw an opportunity to stimulate local industry and to provide the means to supplement the living of the impoverished lower samurai (warrior elite) by encouraging them to make umbrellas.

The local area had a long history of paper making. Mino-washi, a local product, was a strong handmade paper due to the long fibers it contained. Good quality bamboo was to be found in the valley of the Kiso River, and it was easy to obtain sesame oil and lacquer from the local mountains, indispensable for water proofing. These advantages made the area well suited to umbrella making, since the basic construction of Japanese umbrellas involves affixing paper over a frame of bamboo-strip ribs, and then applying oil and lacquer for waterproofing.

Production peaked at the beginning of the 20th century, when over a million umbrellas per year were manufactured. Since then the metal-and-cloth Western-style umbrella has become generally used, and the number of people who use Japanese umbrellas has dwindled. These days the local craftworkers make only few tens of thousands of wagasa a year.

The traditional Japanese umbrella uses only natural materials and, requiring several months to undergo the various separate processes that are needed for completion, the skilled hands of a dozen seasoned craftworkers contribute to the finished item. In addition to the usual type of rain umbrella, Gifu Wagasa also come in various other types including large red outdoor parasols that are used to provide shade on outdoor occasions, such as tea ceremonies. Then there are smaller colorful buyo-gasa that figure in performances of traditional Japanese dance. Gifu Wagasa are an indispensable part of traditional Japanese art and culture.
- source : web-japan.org/atlas/crafts -



................................................................................ Ishikawa 石川県  

Kanazawa wagasa 金沢和傘


- quote -
A wagasa is a Japanese traditional umbrella consisting of washi (Japanese paper) with a bamboo handle and ribs. Japanese traditional umbrellas are still indispensable to the tea ceremony and Japanese dance though Western-style umbrellas have replaced them in Japanese people's daily lives. By taking into consideration the climate of Kanazawa, where it rains or snows a lot, the Kanazawa wagasa is of strong structure with four sheets of Japanese paper pasted to the central part of the umbrella.
Furthermore, the Kanazawa wagasa is characterized by its splendid and graceful color and design.
- source : kanazawa-tourism.com/eng -



................................................................................ Kyoto 京都  

Kyoowagasa 京和傘 Kyo-Wagasa

- quote -
About Kyo Wagasa Umbrellas
The History of Japanese Wagasa Umbrellas
- snip -
- - - - - Traditional Kyoto umbrellas

As the capital of Japan for over 1,000 years (794-1868), Kyoto has been the center of nearly every important aspect of Japanese culture including traditional umbrellas. Compared to other Japanese umbrellas, traditional Kyoto umbrellas are known for their simplicity, delicate beauty, and the exceptional precision of the master craftsmen who make them.
Hiyoshiya
has long had a strong connection with the leading practitioners of the Japanese tea ceremony. Our shop is located around the corner from the headquarters of Japanese two largest tea ceremony schools. In the world of tea ceremony, simplicity and elegance are the two most important aesthetic factors. Hiyoshiya successfully developed an original style of Japanese umbrella, in response to the requests of leading tea ceremony masters. These special, large-size umbrellas are known as Honshiki Nodate-gasa.
Hiyoshiya's umbrellas
are made with the finest quality materials, collected from all over Japan. Different qualities of washi paper are used to suit the specific feeling and style of each kind of umbrella (from Fukui, Gifu and Toyama prefecture). We use the finest bamboo obtained from special groves in Gifu Prefecture or Kyoto City. Additionally, the decorative aspects of our umbrellas make use of a number of traditional Kyoto craft forms including lacquer, braiding, and fine metal work.
- source : wagasa.com/en/kyowagasa -


................................................................................ Tottori 鳥取県  

Yodoegasa 淀江傘
They are made with Inshu washi paper and dried on the sandy beach.



- quote -
"Yodoegasa", Japanese traditional umbrella, has been handmade since Edo Period (17-19c.).
Not only its durability against wind and snow, its unique beautiful yarn decoration is outstanding enough that it was designated as an intangible cultural asset of Yonago city (Tottori Pref., West Japan) by the Japanese government.
Through no less than 70 processes, loads of time and work are required until an umbrella is finished.
Sanin District, in West Japan, is famous for its harsh weather, heavy rain and wind in summer, and snow in winter. To use in such conditions, Yodoegasa is durable with its heavy-duty parts compared to other Japanese umbrellas made in other regions in Japan.
Another distinctive feature of Yodoegasa can be seen on the spreaders connecting the pole and the ribs are finely ornamented with colorful yarns. Ordinary Japanese traditional umbrellas only have simple round shaped decoration made with knitted yarn, But the decoration on Yodoegasa is made by special technique called "kikyo-kazari (Decoration of Kikyo flower: Platycodon grandifloras or balloon flower; a lavender colored flower with five pointed and curled petals) " which is a Kikyo-petal-shaped decoration made with knitted yarn on the ribs .
The skillful technique
and the beauty of Yodoegasa are being revalued by people all over the world, and now it became popular as an interior purpose as well as primary use.
- - - - - Yodoegasa Densho-no-Kai (The society of Preserving Yodoegasa)
- source : jtco.or.jp/en/japanese-crafts -



................................................................................ Wakayama 和歌山県  

Kishu wagasa 紀州和傘


source : myamato.exblog.jp/23827061 ..

They were made in Wakayama, 海南市 Kainan-Town, 日方 Higata.

The paper they used was
保田紙 Yasudagami - Yasuda-gami
or
高野山紙 / 高野紙 Koyagami - Koya-gami
which was introduced by Kobo Daishi Kukai according to Chinese know-how.
This paper was also used for hand fans.

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『寂蓮法師』 Priest Jakuren with Umbrella

Jakuren (1139 - 1202) - Poet from the Hyakunin Isshu 百人一首
歌川国芳 - Utagawa Kuniyoshi
Jakuren (寂蓮) (also known as Fujiwara o Sadanaga (藤原定長)
before becoming a monk) (1139–1202) was a Japanese Buddhist priest and poet. He was adopted by the noted poet Fujiwara no Shunzei upon the death of Shunzei's younger brother. Shunzei originally intended for Sadanaga to be his heir; however, he subsequently had two male offspring of his own, and Sadanaga was forced to step aside in favor of Fujiwara no Sadaie. As was common practice at the time,
he became a monk, and acquired the religious name of Jakuren. Taking Saigyo as his model, he traveled around the country, composing poems of his travels. He was well regarded in his time and frequently associated with Fujiwara no Teika. He was one of the six compilers of the eighth imperial waka anthology, the famous Shin Kokin Wakashū, and thirty-five of his poems were selected for the work. Before he died, he adopted Fujiwara no Ietaka, pupil to Shunzei.
One of his poems was included in the famous poetry anthology Hyakunin Isshu.
- source : wikipedia -



................................................................................ Yamagata 山形県  

Yamagata wagasa 山形和傘



Yamagata umbrella making has a history of about 220 years.
It started in the late Edo period (1789) with the introduction by 矢田部清太郎 Yatabe Kiyotaro.
In the year 1849, the 水野藩 Mizuno clan was moved from 遠州浜松 Hamamatsu to Yamagata, and the umbrella making by low-ranking Samurai was encouraged.

- - - - - Yamagata City - Furuuchi Japanese umbrella shop
- source : pref.yamagata.jp/ou/shokokanko -


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Umbrellas
Yoshida Tooshi 吉田遠志 Yoshida Toshi Yoshida (1911 - 1995)


. . . CLICK here for 和傘 Photos !


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- - - - - Haiku and Senryu - - - - -

kigo and haiku
. kasa かさ /傘 umbrella and parasol .

- - Yosa Buson was very fond of umbrellas -

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5/20/2017

chasen tea whisk

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. Tea Ceremony Saijiki 茶道の歳時記 .
- Introduction -
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chasen 茶筅 / 茶筌 / 茶せん tea whisk



One of the items used in the tea ceremony is the tea whisk.

. Tea Ceremony Saijiki 茶道の歳時記 .
- Introduction -


Bamboo is not only useful, it’s edible, in the form of 筍 (takenoko, bamboo shoots). The empty hollow of bamboo sections can be used in preparing food as well as for carrying it after it’s cooked. Bamboo can also be used to make various utensils. Take 箸 (hashi, chopsticks) and 竹べら (takebera, the bamboo spatula used to scoop steamed rice), as well as
茶筅 (chasen, a bamboo whisk used in the tea ceremony).
. Bamboo (take 竹) - Introduction .

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- quote -
A tea whisk used to whip powdered green tea, matcha 抹茶, and hot water in a tea bowl until it froths.


a) chajimi 茶じみ b) hosaki 穂先 c) karami-ito 絡み糸 d) jiku 軸 e) fushi 節

The whisk is made from one piece of bamboo about 2 to 2 1/2 cm thick and from 9cm to 12cm long. Near one end is a node. A little beyond the node on the longer end, string is interlaced, karami-ito 絡み糸, to hold the longer ends which are split finely into a varying number of extremely thin strips. The string is intertwined to create two rows of strips. Those on the outer edge have their tips curved inwardly, and those pulled toward the center have their tips curved out. This creates a double tipped whisk.
Whisks are classified by the number of tips: those having 80 to 120 or more are called multi-tipped; those with fewer are designated medium or sparse.
White bamboo is preferred by the Ura Senke 裏千家 School;
sooty bamboo by the Omote Senke 表千家 School;
green or purplish bamboo by the Kankyuu'an 官休庵 School.
- source : JAANUS -


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- ABC - List of Chasen from the Prefectures


................................................................................ Nara 奈良県   

quote
Takayama Tea Whisks
Among the foreigners who are interested in Japanese culture, many may find tea ceremony quite interesting. Beautiful shades of green, delicate and deliberate mannerisms and a spirit of gracious service are some of its most appealing aspects. Tools that are used for tea ceremony are also very traditional and may be found only in Japan.
Chasen is a necessity for tea ceremony. It is a tool that looks like a whisk.



It is not for whipping but for mixing hot water and tea powder evenly, a process that determines the texture and taste of the tea. Takayama cho in Ikoma city生駒市, Nara prefecture is known for its 400-year Chasen production history, and its market share is more than 90% of the entire nation’s.
Takayama Chasen is registered as one of the Traditional Crafts of Japan.
A typical Chasen
is constructed with 64 pieces each for its inside and outside, for a total of 128 thinly cut bamboo peels. These are divided into two sections, inside and outside, after being tied together at their ends. Then, each piece is gently stretched to create curves, using only one’s fingertips and a small knife. Although much time and effort is needed to create a Chasen, it is not durable. In fact, some of them reach the end of their lifespan after a single use. Even if you are careful, it will only last several times at most.
A famous Japanese proverb, “Ichigo ichie”,
means that only one opportunity exists for one meeting. In other words, each moment is precious because each moment will never be the same. “Serving tea means this very moment of spending time together will never repeat itself again. Therefore, I will present the best tea I can for you.”
Japan’s grand master of tea, Sen Rikyu, taught this way of thinking. By looking at the delicate feminine shape of Chasen, one is filled with a sense of serenity, and remembers the words of this tea master.
source : japan-brand.jnto.go.jp/crafts


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. . . CLICK here for Photos !
. Reference - chasen tea whisk .


. take gangu 竹玩具 bamboo toys .
- Introduction -

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The Chasen (or bamboo matcha whisk) is an integral part of Chanoyu, the Japanese tea ceremony. It is used to make the powdered green tea called Matcha in a bowl. These days, many types of Chasen can be found in various colors and thickness. The highest quality whisks are made by hand, including the detailed work of curling the thin strands of bamboo.
- source : taooftea.com/product/chasen-bamboo-whisk -


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- - - - - Haiku - - - - -

. chasen matsu 茶筅松 "pine like a tea whisk" .
pulling out small pine seeldings, komatsu hiki 小松引
- kigo for the New Year -

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元旦や青竹茶筅音の冴ゆ
gantan ya aodake chasen oto no sayu

New Year's Day -
the sound of the green tea whisk
is so crisp and clear


秋山のぶ Akiyama Nobu




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- - - #chasen #teawhisk - - - - -
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